Archives For Q&A

mainimage
This time of year we all have our favorite holiday traditions that help us get into the spirit of the season.   Below, we are happy to share with you some of the experiences that those of us  who are a part of the Driehaus Museum enjoy most!  We hope you enjoy and wish you a very Happy Holiday Season!

adele_forweb

Adele Friedman, Museum Member

What is your favorite holiday tradition in the Museum?
“The Driehaus Museum glows in December. When entering, I feel I am transported to another era, and for the time that I am there, I am surrounded by the preeminent craftsmanship and artistry that its time had to offer, elegantly restored and displayed. During the holidays, the Museum is decorated and lit to enhance this experience, to present the very best of December in Chicago.”

beth1_web

Beth Milasius, Guest Services Manager

What is your favorite holiday tradition in the Museum?
“My favorite holiday program at the Museum is Santa Saturday: seeing the children’s faces light up when they see Santa is so magical!”

What is your favorite holiday tradition in Chicago?
“My favorite Chicago holiday tradition is Zoo Lights at Lincoln Park Zoo.  Families are laughing together and entranced by the shapes of the trees and lights.  Seeing the animals at night add to the specialness of the night.”

margie_web

Margie Gaskin, Museum Volunteer

What is your favorite holiday tradition in the Museum?
“I like the carolers out on the front porch.  I had taken my granddaughter to see Annie a few years ago and we walked home and heard them for the first time. It was magical, we loved it and we received the candy canes. It was such a perfect moment.”


What is your favorite holiday tradition in Chicago?

“My favorite Chicago tradition is the festival of lights on Michigan Avenue. I love that it’s a family event. I love the decorations in all the neighborhoods, the lights and the way all the buildings decorate.”

amy1_web

Amy Cole, Museum Guide

What is your favorite holiday tradition in the Museum?
“I love the tradition of the decorations and having the carolers and having James Cebastien play [the piano on Sundays in December]. I like the overall ambiance during the season.”

What is your favorite holiday tradition in Chicago?
“We have gone to the German Christmas market at Daley Plaza for years. I have enjoyed going to the Lincoln Park Conservatory to see their train set up traveling through Chicago landmarks made with all natural materials like twigs and seeds. Chicago is beautiful with all the lights.”

susan1_webSusan Slogoff, Museum Guide

What is your favorite holiday tradition in the Museum?
“My favorite Driehaus holiday tradition is Santa Saturdays. Yes it’s hectic and a bit crazy at the museum those Saturdays, but the kids are having so much fun that it’s infectious…and I love working in the arts and crafts area with them.”

What is your favorite holiday tradition in Chicago?
“My favorite holiday tradition in Chicago occurs annually at the Arboretum and at the Botanic Gardens. The outdoor light shows at the Arboretum are vast and magical, and the Botanic Gardens has a special indoor display of Chicago neighborhood buildings created over the years out of natural plant materials. Antique trains run overhead as you walk through the displays, and there’s hot chocolate while you visit the other lighting displays. I try not to miss these two places each year.”

jamie_webJamie Herndon, Operations and Administrative Manager

What is your favorite holiday tradition in the Museum?
“My favorite holiday tradition at the Museum, is the Member Open House, it’s a great way to see our members, catch up and talk about our favorite things that happened at the Museum over the last year.”

What is your favorite holiday tradition in Chicago?
“My favorite holiday tradition in Chicago is FOR SURE the Santa Train.”

catherine1_webCatherine Laraia, Collections and Exhibitions Coordinator

What is your favorite holiday tradition in the Museum?
“Having the Dining Room table for a 5-course holiday meal.”

What is your favorite holiday tradition in Chicago?
“The Santa train off the Red Line!”

richard-blogOur staff is always asked about their backgrounds and how they came to work at the Driehaus Museum.  So we wanted to share some of our amazing team with everyone. And, as always, let us know if you have any other questions.

First name? Richard

What is your title and what role does your position play at the Driehaus Museum? My role at the Driehaus Museum is the Membership and Volunteer Coordinator. I am here to coordinate many Membership functions and projects. I work very closely with our volunteers to fulfill the needs of the Museum and ensure a worthwhile experience for them. It very rewarding getting to know so many members already after our record breaking exhibition and event calendar.

How long have you worked at the Museum? I joined the Driehaus Museum in September 2015.

Where are you from/where do you currently reside? I was born in Omaha Nebraska. Our neighborhood is called The Field Club Historic District and is listed in The National Register of Historic Places. From an early age, I appreciated this beautiful period in history, design and architecture. I have also lived in New York and San Francisco, but Chicago is home for me.

What is your education/experience background? How or why did you come to work at the Driehaus Museum? I graduated from Loyola University of Chicago with a degree in Business Administration, English, and Communication. I spent over 35 years in specialty retail.  I worked with the legendary Bergdorf Goodman, Saks Fifth Avenue, Barneys, Neiman Marcus, and Bloomingdales.  My background in retail and my role here at the museum are very much aligned.  It’s all about hospitality, surprise and delight, and design and style.

If you were a staff member of the Nickerson Mansion at the turn of the century, what role would you have and why? Since I am not a good cook, I hope my role would be head butler. It would be interesting to be part of all the household functions.

If you were trapped in the Museum overnight, what would you do? Hopefully it would be a snowy winter night so I could light a roaring fire and curl up with a good book.

What is your favorite movie? I love all the British period films like “An Ideal Husband”, “The Importance of Being Earnest”, and “Gosford Park”.   Book? I enjoy anything Agatha Christie.  Each story needs to be discovered again and again for a new layer of detail and plot twist and turns.

What is your favorite holiday/program or event at the Museum? My favorite holiday is Christmas of course! The Museum has sensational decorations and holiday programs that lend themselves nostalgically to this glorious time of the year. Santa Saturday is great fun.

What is your dream job? I’m enjoying my current role tremendously. It’s a real treat to see our guests and members have such a magical experience at the Driehaus Museum.

Tell us about one of your favorite moments during your time working at the Museum?  Just recently, a group of ladies dressed in full jazz flapper style to visit the Dressing Downton exhibition, they looked amazing. It is great fun to see members and guests fully immerse themselves in this period and environment.

In the early decades of the 20th century, the fictional Crawley family of Downton Abbey® hosted grand dinners and fretted about the Great War. At the same time, the real Fisher family was doing the same—right here in this Gilded Age mansion the Driehaus Museum calls ‘home.’

In many ways the Fishers were foils to the Crawleys of Downton. The Fishers lived in America, the Crawleys in England. The Fishers dwelled in an urban palace built in 1883 by another prominent family, while the Crawleys inherited their ancient country estate from a long line of genteel landowners. Lucius George Fisher had everything to gain from the Industrial Revolution, the technical inventions of which made his career in the paper industry soar; Robert Crawley, Earl of Grantham, saw his own way of life rapidly disappearing in the wake of new changes.

And yet the Fishers and Crawleys shared the same world. Inspired by the era of our current Dressing Downton exhibition, we’ve been digging into our archives for this special blog post in order to share, for the first time, the story of the Nickerson Mansion’s second owners who lived here between 1900 and 1916.

 …

Illustration of the mouth of the Chicago River in 1831. From Chicago: A Biography, The University of Chicago Press.

The mouth of the Chicago River in 1831. Illustration from Chicago: A Biography, The University of Chicago Press.

Lumberyards on the Chicago River, about 1870.

Lumberyards on the Chicago River, about 1870. From Chicago: A Biography, The University of Chicago Press.

 

Chicago appeared out of nowhere.

As one New England newspaper put it back in the mid-1800s, it seemed to rise “like an exhalation from the morass upon which it was built.” Lucius George Fisher, Sr., the father of the man who would one day purchase the Nickerson House, came from Vermont to see the spectacle in 1837. There were just a few thousand pioneering citizens in the brand new city then, and it was in the middle of a financial crisis. He kept traveling, eventually landing in Beloit, Wisconsin—a city which he named, and where he made his own name. He played a leading role in all of the city’s major businesses and institutions—from the railway to the bank, newspaper, post office, local government, and police force.

His only son was also named Lucius George Fisher, born in Beloit in 1843. He was educated there and about to enter Beloit College when gold fever hit him, along with the rest of America. Lucius, Jr. convinced his father to let him go west with a wagon and team of oxen. He stayed on the frontier until he moved to New York City in 1861 to work as a clerk in a hardware store. The Civil War broke out that same year, and in 1863 Fisher was mustered with the 84th Regiment of the New York Infantry National Guard. The regiment was discharged after 100 days, so Fisher signed up for the navy and did administrative work aboard the US steamer Wyandack until the war was over in 1865.

By then Fisher’s parents had moved to Chicago, where his father invested in downtown real estate. Fisher joined them there and started working as a porter in the Rock River Paper Company. He ascended quickly, and within five years, he managed the whole paper bag operation. Fisher would stick with the paper industry for the rest of his career. He incorporated his own company, the Union Bag and Paper Co. in the 1870s, and it grew exponentially as he absorbed other manufacturers around the Midwest.

The Union Bag & Paper Company, 3737 S. Ashland Ave., Chicago.

The Union Bag & Paper Company, 3737 S. Ashland Ave., Chicago.

Like his father before him, Fisher invested in Chicago real estate. He owned a 160-acre tract on the south side of the city, between Seventy-ninth and Eighty-third Streets and Cottage Grove and South Park Avenues. When the World’s Columbian Exposition fairgrounds were designated nearby, the land became worth $1 million—equivalent to $266 million today. He leased the land to the fair in 1892 for the building of 600 three-story houses, to be used as visitor accommodations. Perhaps more famously, Fisher invested in real estate closer to the city’s commercial center as well. He commissioned world’s fair architect Daniel H. Burnham to design the Fisher Building, which still stands at 343 S. Dearborn Street. Its 18 stories of orange terra cotta and glass, made it  one of the tallest buildings in the world when completed in 1896.

postcard-chicago-fisher-building-streetcars-elevated-carriages-early

1893view

From around 1885, Fisher and his wife of fifteen years, Katherine, lived in a new red brick Victorian home on Ellis Avenue in Chicago’s Oakland neighborhood. It featured stained glass windows, built-in bookcases, large secluded back garden, and an elegant ballroom on the third floor. The lakeside community was populated, in the late 19th century, with other illustrious members of Chicago society. Many of them were entrepreneurs and industrialists who found it convenient to the stockyards, rail terminal, and factories on the South Side. But around the turn of the century, increasing pollution and immigrant neighbors made the area seem less desirable for some. These residents began migrating north, and the Fisher family also began looking for a new home.

Samuel M. Nickerson, recently retired president of First National Bank of Chicago, had constructed a gorgeous Italianate mansion on the north side of the Chicago River in 1883. The mansion at 40 East Erie Street was reported to be the most expensive and luxurious residence in Chicago at the time of its construction, featuring three stories, more than 17 different kinds of marbles from around the world, capacity for 11 live-in servants, and a grand Sculpture Gallery. Nickerson was 70 years old, and originally from Massachusetts. He wished to go live permanently in his summer home on Cape Cod, so he negotiated a $75,000 purchase—over $2 million in today’s dollars—with Lucius George Fisher for the mansion and many of its contents.

The FIsher's 1885 residence on 4036 Ellis Avenue. (Google Streetview, 2014)

The FIsher’s 1885 residence on 4036 Ellis Avenue. (Google Streetview, 2014)

Samuel_M._Nickerson_residence,_front_elevation_big

Front elevation, Samuel M. Nickerson House. Burling & Whitehouse, architects.

The Samuel M. Nickerson House, 1883.

The Samuel M. Nickerson House, 1883.

The Fishers moved into the Nickerson House in the summer of 1900. The census recorded the home’s inhabitants as Lucius and Katherine, both in their 50s; their four children Lucius, Jr. (age 28), Alice (age 26), Ethel (age 17), and Katherine (age 14); Katherine’s sister Francis Eddy; and three female servants from Germany, Minnesota, and Sweden, respectively.

The Fishers kept most of the original furniture, which had been crafted to match the interior design. But their tastes had little else in common with the Nickersons’ clusters of Victorian objets d’art, competing wall and upholstery patterns, and plenteous furniture. The new century came with a new, streamlined aesthetic. By now Chicago’s Prairie School of architecture, with its horizontal lines and air of simplicity, had come into full swing. Fisher hired Prairie School architect George Washington Maher (1864–1926) to redesign Nickerson’s former Sculpture Gallery to his own liking. He re-envisioned the space as a Trophy Room and filled it with game animals, weaponry, rare books, and a mural of hunting scenes along the curved cornice. Among the crowning achievements of the new design was a massive fireplace, with iridescent Art Nouveau tilework, roaring lacquered cherry lion heads, and massive moose head above the mantel. The other striking feature was a stained glass dome featuring autumnal trees, which has been carefully restored and is on view today.

unspecified-2

unspecified

unspecified-5

If Theodore Roosevelt, with his zeal for hunting large game, had anything to do with defining early 20th century masculinity in America, then Lucius George Fisher’s aesthetic would have fit it perfectly. The heads and bodies of wild game weren’t confined only to the Trophy Room; rather, they featured prominently as a defining decorative feature of the house. The Trophy Room displayed sea turtles, a 12-point buck, African antelope horns, birds both local and exotic, and a magnificent tiger skin rug. The first and second floor Halls featured bear rugs—one with the head still attached—and the heads of bison, buffalo, walrus, reindeer, and bighorn sheep lining the walls. The Dining Room featured a large silver fish bolted to the Lincrusta, an owl, and another grand moose head. Historic photographs, taken for fire insurance purposes, also feature a few hairy and indistinct mysterious animals on andirons and floors, including sheepskin throws and something that looks like a porcupine on the floor of the Drawing Room.

unspecified-3

unspecified-4

Perhaps a remnant of Fisher’s young days on the western frontier seeking gold, the few objets d’art often depicted the American West. A prominent bronze bust in the Smoking Room depicted a Native American chieftan, for example, and a blanket covering an upstairs divan was woven with the colorful triangles of the Southwest. He was not otherwise a major art collector as Nickerson had been before him, although he did purchase the Greek statuary from the 1893 world’s fair and donate it to Beloit College for its permanent collection.

Fisher-smokingroom_past

unspecified-7

Like the rest of Chicago in the early 20th century, the Fishers were confident in their success and enjoyed sharing it. One newspaper item from Christmastime 1902 mentions that the Fishers were the first to kick off that party season with a dinner and dance, and the “big Erie Street house…was decorated in American beauties and Christmas grace.” Few records survive of the other grand parties they certainly hosted in their urban palace in Near North, but previous special occasions, such as debutante receptions in their Ellis Avenue home, prove they were central characters in the city’s elite social class. The society pages in the Chicago Daily Tribune detailed costumes—“Mrs. Fisher wore an apple green and brown brocade gown trimmed with lace, Miss Fisher wore a white crêpe de soie with large white satin sleeves and lace bertha”—and menus—“chocolate, coffee and ice-cream in the billiard room” and “egg-nog in the dining room.”

Fisher Family History-Katherine Fisher to Marry Homer Dixon-Trib6Sept1906

unspecified-9

Lucius George Fisher lived in the Nickerson House for a total of 16 years. In August 1910, he and his wife were traveling in Germany visiting the famous baths of Carlsbad, when Katherine died suddenly and unexpectedly at the age of 61. Fisher returned with her body by ship, and the news came as a shock to the whole family. Fisher himself died on March 16, 1916, inside the Erie Street mansion.

The estate was divided between the three sisters, and Fishers’ youngest daughter Katherine and her husband, Homer Dixon, occupied the mansion after his death. The 1920 census paints a picture of a lively, full household with 33-year-old Katherine at the head. At the time the Dixons had seven children under the age of 11, as well as 11 live-in servants, mainly Scandinavian immigrants.

Thirty-two prominent Chicago families purchased the residence from the Dixons and donated the building to the American College of Surgeons. The rest, of course, is history.

 

 

Corie, Store Manager

Corie, Store Manager

First name? Corie-ann

What is your title and what role does your position play at the Driehaus Museum? Museum Store Manager – My job is to ensure the day to day running of the Museum Store.  I also choose and buy all of the merchandise and set up all of our displays.

How long have you worked at the Museum? I have worked at the Driehaus Museum for three years.

Where are you from/where do you currently reside?  I am originally from a small town just west of Boston.  I moved to Chicago in 2012 and I have loved every moment since coming here!  My husband and I live in University Village and we really enjoy all the new restaurants and stores that are starting to open in our neighborhood. It’s quiet but were still so close to everything downtown.  

What is your education/experience background? How or why did you come to work at the Driehaus Museum?  I went to the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth and received my B.A. in Art History in 2008.  I spent a semester studying at NYU in Paris and completed two internships at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.  I was working outside my degree when I met my husband at the Reagan National Airport in Washington D.C.  He lived in Chicago and eventually I saw it as a great opportunity to move to a new city and get into the museum field.  I interviewed to be a volunteer at the Driehaus Museum and was hired to be a guide instead.  Three months later I was approached with the opportunity to open a new Museum Store for the Driehaus Museum and the rest is history!  

If you were a staff member of the Nickerson Mansion at the turn of the century, what role would you have and why? Could I be “Keeper of the Jewels”?  That is an official job title, right?  If not I would like to be the Ladies Maid.  I have some talent with hair and makeup and I like to think my fashion game is strong. 

If you were trapped in the Museum overnight, what would you do?  I would raid the refrigerator in the staff lounge and make up a lovely dinner for myself.  I would then set the grand table in the Nickerson’s dining room and eat my dinner there.  Since I have started working here I have always imagined what a dinner party would be like in the dining room.

What is your favorite movie?  Book?  I have a soft spot for Pixar Movies but period films tend to also draw me in.  I also read quite a bit but I always go back to Harry Potter every once in a while.

What is your favorite holiday/program or event at the Museum?  Anything tied to the holidays is my favorite.  Starting with the Murder Mystery event and then into our Christmas programming, it is the most fun time of year. I really can’t just choose one.  I do love having a pianist here during Santa Saturdays.  The house has so much energy when live music is being played.

What is your dream job? My dream job, ever since I was little, is to be an expert for the Antiques Roadshow.  I just need to choose a specialty and become an expert in that field.  Jewelry is my passion at the moment.

Tell us about one of your favorite moments during your time working at the Museum? The day the Museum Store opened was so special for me.  I had worked for over 6 months building the look of the store and buying new merchandise.  Seeing the store finally open and people shopping was so exciting and fulfilling!

Emily, Museum Guide

Driehaus Museum —  November 2, 2015 — 1 Comment
Emily, Museum Guide

Emily, Museum Guide

Our staff is always asked about our backgrounds and how they came to work at the Driehaus Museum.  So we wanted to share some of our amazing team with everyone. And, as always, let us know if you have any other questions.

First name? Emily

What is your title and what role does your position play at the Driehaus Museum? Tour Guide- meaning that I give tours, but also answer guest questions on the floor.

How long have you worked at the Museum? Nearly five months.

Where are you from/where do you currently reside? I grew up in the historic town of New Castle, Delaware, which I attribute to my early fascination with history. It was originally settled by the Dutch in 1651 and still has some interesting quirks, including a few cobblestone road that will raddle your brain. Prior to my moving to Chicago, my husband started a job in the city and I followed a couple of months later in June 2014.

What is your education/experience background? How or why did you come to work at the Driehaus Museum? I received my BA in History & German from the University of Delaware, where my research interests were in 18th and 19th century women’s and African-American history. During this time, I joined a digital humanities project called the “Colored Conventions Project”, which aimed at making a public database on Black organizing in the nineteenth-century. From this experience, I realized my interest in the education of the public and the importance it can have on a community.

Feeling unsatisfied with only four years of German, I decided to accept a fellowship at the University of Illinois at Chicago in the department of Germanic Studies. I continue to work on my master’s degree, which this academic year has extended into a Teaching Assistantship. My research interests have changed into gender and sexuality in German literature, particularly in 18th century works. I came to the Driehaus Museum wanting a practical application to my education and to gain experience in the museum world. I am excited to continue working and learning at this beautiful museum.

If you were a staff member of the Nickerson Mansion at the turn of the century, what role would you have and why? I would probably be a normal housekeeper, knowing that my cooking skills wouldn’t please the Nickerson’s.

If you were trapped in the Museum overnight, what would you do? If I could do anything, I would use years of classical piano training and play the Chickering and Sons piano in the Drawing Room.

What is your favorite movie?  Book? All-time favorite movie is Jaws. Favorite English book is a series called Incarnations of Immortality by Piers Anthony. Favorite German book is a young reader’s book called “Momo” by Michael Ende, who more famously wrote The NeverEnding Story.

What is your dream job? Anything that would pay me to travel to unique places.

If you’ve ever visited the Museum, you may have noticed that the visitor toilets all seem to be from another age. The seats are polished wood and the cistern sits high overhead, flushed by a chain with a porcelain handle. The porcelain bowl rim reads, “The Venerable,” and the seal: “The Venerable Thomas Crapper & Company, Made in Gt. Britain.”

Continue Reading...
Laura-Caroline, Collections & Exhibitions Manager at the Driehaus Museum

Laura-Caroline, Collections & Exhibitions Manager at the Driehaus Museum

Our staff is always asked about our backgrounds and how they came to work at the Driehaus Museum.  So we wanted to share some of our amazing team with everyone.  And, as always, let us know if you have any other questions.

First name?  Laura-Caroline

What is your title and what role does your position play at the Driehaus Museum?  I’m the Collections & Exhibitions Manager at the Driehaus Museum. I help care for and manage the historic interiors of the house and our decorative arts collection; and, in addition, I manage the planning, organization, and installation of our permanent and temporary exhibitions, like Maker & Muse and our upcoming Dressing Downton installations.

How long have you worked at the Museum?  I joined the team in May of 2014, so just a little over a year.

Where are you from/where do you currently reside?  Originally, I’m from Greenville, South Carolina. I live in Chicago’s exciting Logan Square neighborhood now and moved to the city about six years ago, by way of Memphis, TN and Washington D.C.

What is your education/experience background? How or why did you come to work at the Driehaus Museum?  I started working in galleries and museums at the age of 16 and never looked back. So, my art background is already a bit of a long one. I studied Art History at Rhodes College in Memphis (go Lynx cats!). When I finished, I received a year-long academic internship working in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s curatorial and registrar’s departments, organizing exhibitions and researching for exhibition catalogues. I eventually returned to Memphis to act as project coordinator for a public art organization called the UrbanArt Commission, taking care of the city’s art collection while planning new art projects throughout Memphis with local, regional, and national artists.

But, being a total nerd and missing school, I moved to Chicago to attend The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), where I received dual master’s degrees in Modern Art History, Theory, & Criticism and Arts Administration & Policy. While at SAIC, I worked as Chief Registrar for the Roger Brown Study Collection a house museum in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood, I was curator for the school’s Creativity in the Workplace program, curating approximately fourteen exhibitions a year throughout Chicagoland, and for a year I served as the program coordinator for SAIC’s Visiting Artists Program before deciding to go back into exhibitions and collections management, which is how I found myself at the Driehaus Museum. Previously, my focus was in modern and contemporary art, so this Gilded Age collection is a new and exciting venture for me!

If you were trapped in the Museum overnight, what would you do?  While painstakingly installing 275 pieces of jewelry last January for our Maker & Muse exhibition, it sometimes felt like we WERE trapped in the museum overnight—these shows don’t install themselves, you know!

But, if I were not installing, had free reign of the place, and were allowed to break every collections-care rule in the book? I would absolutely post up in the Library’s (attributed to the Herter Bros.) chair under the gryphon lamp with a glass of scotch, a cigar, and a good book for the night. I also played piano for many years when I was younger, so I’d likely spend time on our Chickering & Sons piano in the Drawing Room. And, if friends are invited, then I wouldn’t pass up on a dance party opportunity in the Ballroom either. The house offers lots of great overnight possibilities, now that I think about it…

What is your favorite holiday/program or event at the Museum?  If you’ve never been to the Museum around the winter holidays, you really have to put it on your bucket list. We’re over-the-top, but tastefully decorated with holiday décor that—while wreaking havoc on the collections team for the amount of glitter that gets deposited everywhere—looks absolutely stunning and will immediately put you in the holiday spirit, even after a long afternoon of Michigan Avenue holiday shopping. Therefore, I’d have to go with Santa Saturdays being my favorite program at the museum. Because, who doesn’t want to have brunch with the jolliest man alive in such a lovely setting!?

Tell us about one of your favorite moments during your time working at the Museum?  I work with amazing colleagues here at the Driehaus Museum, so picking one favorite moment is difficult and with a job as multifaceted as this one, every day is an adventure! I’ll give two examples. The first is one of the most memorable, though perhaps not necessarily my favorite. Our second floor features an original water closet in between Addie’s and Mrs. Nickerson’s bedrooms, which now act as exhibition galleries for us. During my third week of working at the museum, it came to my attention that the non-functioning original facilities within that water closet had been put to use for their originally intended purposes. It was in the process of determining how to handle that situation that I realized that this new job would not be like any other I’d ever experienced…

One of the sweetest moments I’ve had yet came on the last day of installation of the Maker & Muse exhibition. Our team worked many late hours for two weeks to install this extensive exhibition. The last day of install in particular was filled with intricate installation needs and last minute touch ups, in preparation for Mr. Driehaus’s first viewing of the exhibition that evening. But, the team finished with about an hour to spare. That brief period, between putting the last necklace in its case and showing the exhibition to its first visitor, found our team sitting on the main hall steps, having the first moment in months to really absorb and observe what it was we’d all been working towards. That shared sense of calm, pride, and enthusiastic exhaustion was really very special.

Part of the Museum’s mission is to champion the ideals of preservation. Here’s a look at one of the most impressive parts of our award-winning restoration of 2003–2008: cleaning a crust of pollutants from the sandstone exterior.

Continue Reading...
Claire, Museum Guide at the Driehaus Museum

Claire, Museum Guide at the Driehaus Museum

Our staff is always asked about our backgrounds and how they came to work at the Driehaus Museum.  So we wanted to share some of our amazing team with everyone.  And, as always, let us know if you have any other questions.

First name?  Claire

What is your title and what role does your position play at the Driehaus Museum?  Museum guide. I give tours of the Nickerson mansion to guests of the museum.

How long have you worked at the Museum? 8.5 Months

Where are you from/where do you currently reside?  I am from Minnesota and I currently live in Wicker Park

What is your education/experience background? How or why did you come to work at the Driehaus Museum?  I have a Bachelor’s degree from DePaul University in anthropology and art history. I also have a Master’s in Archaeology from the University of Glasgow.

If you were a staff member of the Nickerson Mansion at the turn of the century, what role would you have and why?  Probably something like a ladies’ maid because I hate doing dishes and laundry.

If you were trapped in the Museum overnight, what would you do?  Expect all of the objects to come to life.

What is your favorite movie?   My favorite movie is probably a tie between The Princess Bride and Star Wars: Return of the Jedi.

What is your favorite holiday/program or event at the Museum?  I liked working the Driehaus Prize event because we got to go into the Murphy Auditorium.

What is your dream job?  Something in the curatorial department in a museum dealing with art objects, artifacts, etc.

Tell us about one of your favorite moments during your time working at the Museum?  I thought it was pretty funny when someone asked me to explain hysteria during a tour.

Lindsay, Marketing Manager at the Driehaus Museum

Lindsay, Marketing Manager at the Driehaus Museum

Our staff is always asked about our backgrounds and why we ended up working for the Driehaus Museum.  So we wanted to share some of our amazing team with everyone.  And, as always, let us know if you have any other questions.

First name? Lindsay

What is your title and what role does your position play at the Driehaus Museum? Marketing Manager – I handle the advertising, marketing, social media, PR, as well as the website for the Museum.

Where are you from/where do you currently reside? I grew up in a tiny town outside of Houston, Texas.  In 2006, my wife and I moved to Chicago sight unseen and fell in love with the Lakeview area. We decided to try out downtown living in 2013, moved to the South Loop, and have enjoyed being able to walk to/from anything happening in the city such as the Pritzker Pavilion, Art Institute, Lollapalooza, Jazz Fest, etc.

What is your education/experience background? How or why did you come to work at the Driehaus Museum? I have a BFA in Graphic Design & Advertising, as well as minors in both English and Art History from Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas.  My dream was to work in an art museum, and tried on many occasions to get a job at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston.  Each time I was told to start lower – interning, volunteering, or taking a small job such as in the store.

When we moved to Chicago, the job I was transferring with fell through once we got into the city which caused me to start a hunt for something new.  A position opened up as a supervisor in the store at The Field Museum and I easily got the job with my extensive retail background.  It only took about 6 months until I was promoted to the back office area helping out the buyers.  I stayed with the Field for over 8 years, holding several different positions, lastly in the Communications department. During my time at the Field, I went back to school and earned a Masters of Arts in Museum Studies, as I had finally decided that this was the career for me.

I decided I missed my art history roots, began searching out art museums in the city and happened upon the Driehaus Museum.  After reading about how new (in the museum world) it was and how the Museum was started thanks to Mr. Driehaus, I was shocked that more people in the city didn’t know about it.  And I wanted to tell everyone.  So when the position for the Marketing Manager came up I knew I had to jump on it so I could tell everyone about this hidden treasure of a museum!

If you were a staff member of the Nickerson Mansion at the turn of the century, what role would you have and why? Most likely the cook since I love cooking and entertaining for others.

If you were trapped in the Museum overnight, what would you do? If it was possible, I would light the fireplace in the Front Parlor, pull the sofa from the Drawing Room into the Parlor, bring in a bottle of wine, and read by fire light in the mansion as the city bustles about outside.

What is your favorite movie?  Book? Favorite movie is Jurassic Park.  Favorite book is a tie between Orlando by Virginia Woolf, The Princess Bride and any of the Harry Potter books (though Goblet of Fire has always held a special place in my heart).

What is your favorite holiday/program or event at the Museum? The Summer Servants tour.  I have never experienced a living history tour until coming to the Driehaus Museum.  It is a engaging and educational way to learn about the Nickerson family, the house, as well as the Gilded Age.

What is your dream job? Ever since I was little I wanted to be a paleontologist – but then I discovered you had to be decent at math, which is my worst subject.  So if they took that part out and just let me dig in the dirt all day I would be a happy camper.

Tell us about one of your favorite moments during your time working at the Museum? The day we announced the Downton Abbey exhibition to the public was so much fun.  Watching the press and social media grabbing onto to the news and being so excited about it made me smile.  Not to mention the amount of messages from my own friends wanting to come see it.  Sorry guys! You have to wait until October to purchase tickets just like everyone else! I cannot wait to see this exhibition in person when it’s installed inside the mansion.  It’s going to be very elegant and so enjoyable for fans of the show, myself included.